World Ecig News

Posted 20th June 2016 by Dave Cross
Leading cigalike companies embrace legislation that will boost their business by crushing smaller companies. Meanwhile, outright bans are taking place in individual countries and American doctors continue to over-hype the dangers of explosions. Thank goodness a leading British sportsperson is pictured embracing a safer alternative to smoking.

“This is the first I am hearing about this,” is the most popular response to V2’s survey into the impact of the FDA’s regulations in the USA. But fear not, even though they knew nothing about something that has been hugely published, 74% of vapers believe that the industry needs regulating.

Adam Kustin, vice president of marketing for V2 said: “Vapers want common sense regulations to ensure consumer protection and product standards. Big Tobacco companies, with their virtually unlimited resources, benefit tremendously from an onerous and costly application process.”

He isn’t wrong if Jenni Roberts’ attitude is anything to go by. The vice president of customer marketing for Blu (UK) said: “After speaking to numerous retailers, we have discovered that there is a lot of confusion regarding the new legislation for the e-cigarette category.  However, at Blu we have been telling retailers the same thing – we wholeheartedly welcome most of the changes and we think they should too.”

Introducing her guide to the new TPD legislation, “It is estimated that around a third of e-cigarette sales go through traditional retail, and two thirds sold online and in vape shops, but things will change over the next 12-18 months. We believe that the EUTPD legislation presents one of the biggest opportunities for convenience retailers we’ve seen in a long time, if only they are willing to grab it.”

Not the retailers in India though. Punjab, Maharashtra and Chandigarh have already banned vaping devices and Karnataka is set to swiftly follow on their heels. “Campaigns warning people of the health hazards of smoking seldom address the dangers posed by e-cigarettes,” writes the Times of India, “which are equally harmful.” Equally? Really?

Yes, say the great and the good in Saudi Arabia. A Royal Decree has been issued to ban smoking and vaping after June 6th from the vicinities of religious, educational, health, sport and cultural institutions, social and charity institutions, in areas for manufacturing and processing food products and drinks, petrol, gas and fuel distribution systems, warehouses, elevators and restrooms, in addition to several unspecified public places. People breaking this ban face a fine of almost £4,000 – although they won’t receive the additional lashes given to the woman who received a similar fine for insulting a Saudi man on Whatsapp.

Maybe they are worried about the dangers of devices exploding like they are at the University of Alabama? “There is no shortage of stories of electronic cigarettes or vaporizer devices that exploded or caught on fire,” say doctors adding another pointless story about it to search engines everywhere. “While these devices are billed as a safer alternative to cigarettes, don’t believe the hype,” continues a spokesperson that shouldn’t be believed either.

Fortunately British journalists weren’t paying any attention, as they were preoccupied with Leicester and England’s Jamie Vardy. The super striker was pictured attending training carrying *shock* a can of Red Bull and *wow* a tin of “nicotine pouches”. Well, that is unless you work for the Daily Star and confuse Snus for nicotine patches.

Snus has received similar treatment to that being meted out to ecigs. Vardy is a former smoker who is using Snus to help him overcome his addiction but 5 Live’s Adrian Chiles was worried it would encourage a horde of children to take up the pouch habit. Luckily Louise Ross was on hand to downplay any danger. 

 Dave Cross
Article by Dave Cross
Freelance writer, physicist, karateka, dog walker