POTV - Your vaping community

Wanting to join the rest of our members? Why not sign up today!

Register

Coils. What's safe and what's not?

Discussion in 'Tobacco Harm Reduction' started by RyanOtekki, Apr 28, 2017.

  1. RyanOtekki

    RyanOtekki Initiate

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hey Guys

    Is the type of metal we're heating up ever properly looked into? I feel it gets overlooked. I have read and watched every video and article online regarding it.

    I have always used kanthol and just started using SS316l. I used to glow my kanthol but don't go beyond a full glow with my SS and usually stick to around 60 watts.

    Is there a danger in heating metal? Advice? A safest metal?
     
  2. Miss Pepper

    Miss Pepper Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    16,550
    Likes Received:
    6,621
  3. Tubbyengineer

    Tubbyengineer Legend

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Messages:
    10,713
    Likes Received:
    6,789
    As far as I know there haven't been any vaping studies done of the metals used in coils - However since the properties of these metals are so well known it's not really necessary. At vaping temperatures there are no significant risks involved with any of the common vaping wires and anyone who says differently probably doesn't understand the Physics and Chemistry behind vaping. At higher temperatures - where wires start to glow then there are some slight risks involved - Titanium is Flammable and can set on fire above a certain temperature and Titanium Dioxide is a possible carcinogen - however exposure would be extremely low, so low as not to make a statistical difference. NiChrome could potentially release Hexavalent Chromium which is pretty nasty - However the circumstances are unlikely to be met in any possible vaping application, Nickel - there have been several scare stories about Nickel, however it's not known to cause any real issues and any attempt to dry burn a Nickel coil will usually destroy it, SS316 has no known issues - It is after all a medical grade material and is also used extensively in the food processing industry. Kanthal A1 (that's the correct spellng BTW) is used in millions of heating applications and no one has suffered ill effects from it - including you when you used your toaster this morning. NiFe30 / Resitherm, basically Iron and nickel - No known issues...

    There are other wires that get used - Most are simply different alloys of the ones above but there are also things like Gold, Invar, Tungsten and Niobium - Pretty much all of those are so rare as vaping wirest that they can be pretty well ignored.
     
    • Like Like x 16
    • Thank Thank x 3
  4. fyslexic ducker

    fyslexic ducker Achiever

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2016
    Messages:
    1,754
    Likes Received:
    700
    Gold Coils...hmmmm how cool would they look you might be onto something there...you and @smut TubbyGoldSmutons anyone? £179 pair.
     
    • LOL LOL x 2
  5. Arctic_Wolf

    Arctic_Wolf Achiever

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,820
    Likes Received:
    1,259
    Sorry hon, I'm kinda predisposed at the moment and keep missing your tags!! My apologies!!

    Am definitely with @Tubbyengineer on this subject however. Titanium needs some care but it's not used as commonly as other wires and in general it's a more advanced or well informed vaper that tends to use it for DIY purposes anyway. Yes, there are some stock Ti coils available, but used correctly in TC mode, like Nickel I don't believe there are any significant dangers to any of the materials we use to vape with when used appropriately, responsibly and as intended.

    Just my humble opinion of course. Nickel is a favourite of mine as somehow it seems to give me deeper richer flavours with specific liquids than other wires. I enjoy SS too however as that seems to give a clean sharper flavour, so I use a specific wire with specific flavours of liquids with good effect :). Very odd how that all works, but would think it's the rate at which a coil heats up that's as much a factor as the actual material. The individual properties and resistance of the different materials available makes a stark difference as to just how quickly they ramp up and TC doing its part as well can really help some flavours stand out a lot more too.

    As ever, a lot of scare mongering still going on regarding vaping products and consumables but 99% of it is quickly debunked. As long as we have highly trained technical minds like Tubby, Mooch, (endless list of people for endless subjects) to explain some of the science to us rationally and objectively, I think we'll all continue to be quite safe vaping away with what's readily available (used responsibly and appropriately of course ;) ).

    @RyanOtekki .... There will of course occasionally be individuals with a direct intolerance or allergy to a specific material (wire), liquids, VG, PG or specific flavour concentrates, and sometimes even cotton or older silica wicking too. Such cases are minorities however and could easily be classified as rare, but they do happen. For the vast majority however, most won't ever have any problems with anything vaping related at all :).

    You may vape away happily and safely bud :D.
     
    • Like Like x 7
  6. zouzounaki

    zouzounaki Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2016
    Messages:
    21,668
    Likes Received:
    11,150
    I read this article by Dr Farsolinos about dry burning coils.

    http://www.ecigarette-research.org/research/index.php/research/research-2015/212-db

    I used to dry burn coils but since reading this I've not been doing it, and haven't noticed any difference apart from having to rebuild a little more often instead of dry burning and running under the tap to clean old coils. No problems of hotspots, no difference in performance since stopping dry burning.

    But apart from the dry burning thing, which I think might be important to be aware of, I don't really worry about the issue, the more knowledgeable posters above seem to reassure as well.

    I always use ss316 because I prefer the flavour, never dry burn them, and just recoil when it's a bit manky and black looking.

    :aside: Jesus this mobile phone is so annoying with it's habit of autocorrecting "coils" to "cools"!!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Thank Thank x 1
  7. redmatt76

    redmatt76 Postman

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2016
    Messages:
    662
    Likes Received:
    250
    Seen a thing few years back with spoons made of different metals all used in the same yoghurt. The flavours were different for the different metals. As far as i remember the gold spoon had the best flavour. Cant remember other metals that were used. But interesting @Arctic_Wolf and others saying that stainless gives a crisper flavour.
    Gonna try n find n post the vid.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Maniac

    Maniac Postman

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2017
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    47
    Need to try SS, heard a lot about how good it is but never tried one, just Kanthal A1 and NiCrome all the way
     
  9. zouzounaki

    zouzounaki Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2016
    Messages:
    21,668
    Likes Received:
    11,150
    I find the flavour is better with SS, did a few side by side comparisons a while ago. I definitely find r cleaner. It has lower resistance per mass as well which I think also appeals to some folk.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. zouzounaki

    zouzounaki Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2016
    Messages:
    21,668
    Likes Received:
    11,150
    I'm confident SS316L is safe as well from the bit of research I did when I decis s to switch to it.
     

Share This Page